Tourism in Finland

27.04.2024
98
Update: 13.07.2024
<p>Are you planning a trip to Finland?&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Means of travel</strong></p><p>You will most likely arrive to Helsinki Airport (Vantaa).&nbsp;</p><p>Then you can choose&nbsp;different means of transport for travelling across the country:&nbsp;</p><p>1. Renting a car. If you want to travel easily in Finland without any limits. You can discover different regions and places and start your trip in one place and then return back the car in other city (upon request). We recommend to contact in advance car renting company, plan the itinerary and discuss details with its support.&nbsp;</p><p>2. You can travel by train. Trains are going according to the schedule, quiet fast and there are a lot of stops in different cities and towns. Go to the official website of the Finnish railways and book your ticket online https://www.vr.fi/en The train doesn’t go directly to your accommodation but you can get off at the nearest station and then book a transfer or a taxi: Imatra for Saimaa Lakeside cottages and Kuopio or Siilinjärvi for Tahko Hills cottages. A few websites to book a taxi https://www.imatrantaksi.fi/ for Saimaa Lakeside cottage complex and https://taksi1.fi/ for Tahko Hills cottage complex.&nbsp;</p><p>If you live in Bergamo or close to this town, there are direct flights by Ryanair to Lappeenranta. Our cottages Saimaa Lakeside are located only from 60 km from Lappeenranta. And as you know Ryanair it’s a low cost company.&nbsp;</p><p>Travelling by car in Europe, probably you will take the way Estonia-Finland by ferry. Traffic and roads are very comfortable for driving in Finland. Please pay attention and obey the road rules, otherwise fines are extremely high in Finland. There are a lot of video and photo survey on roads. If you have an accident, call the police even though both parties came to a conclusion. It will help you to discuss the following details with the insurance. Call for free in an urgent case: 112 or 10022.&nbsp;</p><p>You can rent a car in any company but our guests recommended the service Discover Cars https://www.discovercars.com where you can choose any types of vehicle according to your requests: sedan, Crossover, 4x4, MPV etc.&nbsp;One important fact is that the support is a multilingual team and there is no hidden fees.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Mobile communication</strong></p><p>The Finnish area code is +358. Tip: you can make calls free of charge via Skype, WhatsApp, Viber and other internet applications, especially as all our cottages have free wi-fi. If you need to make a lot of calls and have mobile internet on your phone, it is recommended to buy a Finnish SIM card (sold without documents in R-kioski).</p><p><strong>Shopping in Finland&nbsp;</strong></p><p>Large shopping centers are open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on weekdays and until 6 p.m. on weekends. Small shops and private shops operate on their own schedule, usually from 9 to 18 on weekdays, until 16 on Saturday, with Sunday off. We recommend that you check the opening hours of the shops you need in advance on the map of the region. Most shops are closed on holidays.&nbsp;Especially attractive prices during the sale seasons, which start on a clear schedule. Winter (Christmas) sale starts on 27 December and lasts for 1 month, summer sale is held after national holiday Juhannus (floating date at the end of June). Shops can organize a local sale, in which case the sign "ALE" or the familiar "SALE" appears in the windows. Here you can bargain with the seller. Second-hand shops in Finland are labelled "UFF". Don't forget about the tax free system!</p><p><strong>Emergency telephone numbers</strong> (call for free):</p><p>Police, including traffic police: 112</p><p>10022 Fire Service</p><p>112 Ambulance</p><p><strong>Alcohol</strong></p><p>The government has a monopoly on alcohol production thus alcohol is sold in excellent quality but at high prices. Alcohol markets “ALKO" are most often located in the central districts of the city. The standard working hours are: Mon-Fri 9:00-18:00, Fri 9:00-20:00, Sat 9:00-16:00, but they can vary. Please note that ALKO shops are closed on Sundays and public holidays. Beer and cider can be purchased in supermarkets. In restaurants you cannot consume alcohol that you have brought with you. In Duty Free shops you can buy alcohol at lower prices. Don't forget about customs regulations.</p><p><strong>Smoking</strong>&nbsp;</p><p>Smoking is prohibited in public places, including transport; customer service areas; educational establishments; offices and other workplaces; on school grounds; and at public events. Tobacco products may not be sold to anyone under 18 years of age.</p><p>Tax free: when you buy goods (except books and tobacco products) in Finland, you can get a partial refund - tax free. Depending on the type of product, it ranges from 8 to 17 per cent, with an average of 10 per cent. When leaving the country, you must present the receipt filled in by the shop assistant. People who have a work permit in any EEC country cannot get tax free.</p><p><strong>Time zone</strong></p><p>Standard time zone: UTC / GMT +2 hours in winter time and +3 hours in summer time. </p><p><strong>Climate</strong></p><p>Finland is characterised by a temperate climate, and depending on the direction of air currents, the climate can change from maritime to continental. 25% of Finland's territory lies above the Arctic Circle. Each season is distinct in its manifestation of climatic features: winters are moderately cold, with precipitation in the form of rain and snow in spring and autumn, while summers are relatively warm and the weather with rare rains and morning fogs. The coldest day was recorded on 28 January 1999 in Kittilä municipality (Lappi), where the air temperature was -51.5 ⁰C. In summer, the air periodically warms up to +30 ⁰C. The maximum temperature record was recorded on 29 July 2010 in the community of Liperi (North Karelia): +37.2 ⁰C.</p><p>Due to the fact that most of Finland is covered by forests and lakes, the temperature in holiday areas is perceived as comfortable.</p><p>Most of Finland is in the lowlands, but in the north-east some mountains reach more than 1000 metres. For lovers of active holidays, skiing, snowboarding, snowmobiling in winter, which traditionally starts from the beginning of December and ends at the end of April, is suitable.</p><p>Summer holidays will appeal to those who appreciate water scenery among forests in the region of South Karelia on Lake Saimaa. In July, the average air temperature is 21 ⁰C.</p><p>If you dream of seeing a polar day, you can do it in Finland from the beginning of June to the beginning of July. The peak is from 22 to 23 June. The sun does not set at all at this time, and on the Sunday closest to these dates Finns celebrate their traditional holiday Juhannnus. </p><p><br></p><p><br></p><p><br></p>

Are you planning a trip to Finland? 

Means of travel

You will most likely arrive to Helsinki Airport (Vantaa). 

Then you can choose different means of transport for travelling across the country: 

1. Renting a car. If you want to travel easily in Finland without any limits. You can discover different regions and places and start your trip in one place and then return back the car in other city (upon request). We recommend to contact in advance car renting company, plan the itinerary and discuss details with its support. 

2. You can travel by train. Trains are going according to the schedule, quiet fast and there are a lot of stops in different cities and towns. Go to the official website of the Finnish railways and book your ticket online https://www.vr.fi/en The train doesn’t go directly to your accommodation but you can get off at the nearest station and then book a transfer or a taxi: Imatra for Saimaa Lakeside cottages and Kuopio or Siilinjärvi for Tahko Hills cottages. A few websites to book a taxi https://www.imatrantaksi.fi/ for Saimaa Lakeside cottage complex and https://taksi1.fi/ for Tahko Hills cottage complex. 

If you live in Bergamo or close to this town, there are direct flights by Ryanair to Lappeenranta. Our cottages Saimaa Lakeside are located only from 60 km from Lappeenranta. And as you know Ryanair it’s a low cost company. 

Travelling by car in Europe, probably you will take the way Estonia-Finland by ferry. Traffic and roads are very comfortable for driving in Finland. Please pay attention and obey the road rules, otherwise fines are extremely high in Finland. There are a lot of video and photo survey on roads. If you have an accident, call the police even though both parties came to a conclusion. It will help you to discuss the following details with the insurance. Call for free in an urgent case: 112 or 10022. 

You can rent a car in any company but our guests recommended the service Discover Cars https://www.discovercars.com where you can choose any types of vehicle according to your requests: sedan, Crossover, 4x4, MPV etc. One important fact is that the support is a multilingual team and there is no hidden fees. 

Mobile communication

The Finnish area code is +358. Tip: you can make calls free of charge via Skype, WhatsApp, Viber and other internet applications, especially as all our cottages have free wi-fi. If you need to make a lot of calls and have mobile internet on your phone, it is recommended to buy a Finnish SIM card (sold without documents in R-kioski).

Shopping in Finland 

Large shopping centers are open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on weekdays and until 6 p.m. on weekends. Small shops and private shops operate on their own schedule, usually from 9 to 18 on weekdays, until 16 on Saturday, with Sunday off. We recommend that you check the opening hours of the shops you need in advance on the map of the region. Most shops are closed on holidays. Especially attractive prices during the sale seasons, which start on a clear schedule. Winter (Christmas) sale starts on 27 December and lasts for 1 month, summer sale is held after national holiday Juhannus (floating date at the end of June). Shops can organize a local sale, in which case the sign "ALE" or the familiar "SALE" appears in the windows. Here you can bargain with the seller. Second-hand shops in Finland are labelled "UFF". Don't forget about the tax free system!

Emergency telephone numbers (call for free):

Police, including traffic police: 112

10022 Fire Service

112 Ambulance

Alcohol

The government has a monopoly on alcohol production thus alcohol is sold in excellent quality but at high prices. Alcohol markets “ALKO" are most often located in the central districts of the city. The standard working hours are: Mon-Fri 9:00-18:00, Fri 9:00-20:00, Sat 9:00-16:00, but they can vary. Please note that ALKO shops are closed on Sundays and public holidays. Beer and cider can be purchased in supermarkets. In restaurants you cannot consume alcohol that you have brought with you. In Duty Free shops you can buy alcohol at lower prices. Don't forget about customs regulations.

Smoking 

Smoking is prohibited in public places, including transport; customer service areas; educational establishments; offices and other workplaces; on school grounds; and at public events. Tobacco products may not be sold to anyone under 18 years of age.

Tax free: when you buy goods (except books and tobacco products) in Finland, you can get a partial refund - tax free. Depending on the type of product, it ranges from 8 to 17 per cent, with an average of 10 per cent. When leaving the country, you must present the receipt filled in by the shop assistant. People who have a work permit in any EEC country cannot get tax free.

Time zone

Standard time zone: UTC / GMT +2 hours in winter time and +3 hours in summer time.

Climate

Finland is characterised by a temperate climate, and depending on the direction of air currents, the climate can change from maritime to continental. 25% of Finland's territory lies above the Arctic Circle. Each season is distinct in its manifestation of climatic features: winters are moderately cold, with precipitation in the form of rain and snow in spring and autumn, while summers are relatively warm and the weather with rare rains and morning fogs. The coldest day was recorded on 28 January 1999 in Kittilä municipality (Lappi), where the air temperature was -51.5 ⁰C. In summer, the air periodically warms up to +30 ⁰C. The maximum temperature record was recorded on 29 July 2010 in the community of Liperi (North Karelia): +37.2 ⁰C.

Due to the fact that most of Finland is covered by forests and lakes, the temperature in holiday areas is perceived as comfortable.

Most of Finland is in the lowlands, but in the north-east some mountains reach more than 1000 metres. For lovers of active holidays, skiing, snowboarding, snowmobiling in winter, which traditionally starts from the beginning of December and ends at the end of April, is suitable.

Summer holidays will appeal to those who appreciate water scenery among forests in the region of South Karelia on Lake Saimaa. In July, the average air temperature is 21 ⁰C.

If you dream of seeing a polar day, you can do it in Finland from the beginning of June to the beginning of July. The peak is from 22 to 23 June. The sun does not set at all at this time, and on the Sunday closest to these dates Finns celebrate their traditional holiday Juhannnus.